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A thousand times the mysteries unfold like galaxies in my head.


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Why did Tomb Raider had to be reinvented? What was wrong with the generously breasted, fully lipped flawless female pistol wielder that used to territorial piss on ancient tombs with lame British jokes? If you look back in the press, it seems as if the Indiana Jones femme fatale concept has suddenly become exhausted, at least from the game publisher’s point of view. Does this mean that games are growing up, or is this the direct result of the fact that the demographics of players are changing, that women are slowly taking their rightful place at the keyboard and gamepad?

What if you could have the ideal Kafkaesque experience, without losing your humanity? What if YOU, instead of Gregor Samsa, "awake one morning from uneasy dreams and find yourself transformed in your bed into a gigantic insect"? "The Plan" is a nifty 15-minute experience that gives you exactly this literary, yet visceral, opportunity.

In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth. And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light. God saw that the light was good, and He separated the light from the darkness. God called the light "day," and the darkness he called it "night." By the sixth day, we are told that God also created man. And then, in the seventh day, he decided to rest, content of what He had created. Bearing Schopenhauer in mind, I prefer to believe we are still in the seventh day, contemplating a God that has hidden himself from his creation, leaving this world for a less complex one: in his free time, God… is playing The Sims.

It is said that love goes through the stomach. Sunny chicken drumsticks, fine sauces, barmy sweets, they all sacrifice themselves for the feeling of love to purely prevail. For P. B. Winterbottom, who is a sort of ironic Daniel Day-Lewis clone (just imagine him playing the butcher in Gangs of New York), the ode to food is even more important, because his whole life goes through the above-mentioned stomach.

 

The currency of war is life. We pay the cost and hope in the end it was worth it.

The currency of war is life. But, at the same time, it’s the war that determines the damned souls it devours to be aware of the real value of life, in those unique circumstances they experience. War, more than any other event, generates the most surprising of stories, as if all characters involved in the bloodshed would feel the Apocalypse in the air and would rush into frantically living their last moments. Dragon Age: Origins is a game about war. Although the narrative of the game flows in a very Tolkeinesque manner, the seriousness of the confrontations brings to front not the war between races, but, as I underlined above, a colorful bunch of characters, with distinct lives and origins.

[gallery type="slideshow" size="medium" link="none" ids="1383,1382,1381,1380,1379" orderby="rand"] Taking a trip down memory lane is never pretty. Who knows what skeletons you might accidentally take out of the closet? And there's a risk that those skeletons are not what you remember them to be. Our mind is used to adding a LOT of makeup. It's dramatically called coping with the unbearable reality. But this is never useful if you're dealing with the fast evolving technology. Or, by extension, with video games. Which brings us to Gabriel Knight...

[gallery type="slideshow" size="medium" ids="905,904,903,902,901,906" orderby="rand"] Well folks, it's done. I've munched through the last latest title in the Blackwell Series - The Blackwell Deception. And expected or not, the deception part in the title kinda sums up how I felt about this episode. Blackwell Deception has the feeling of a game from a s eries that is finally settling down. That is both good and bad I guess.

[gallery type="slideshow" link="none" size="medium" ids="878,877,876,875,874,873,872" orderby="rand"] I can't believe I have already finished the third title in the Blackwell series: Blackwell Convergence. On the one hand, I feel like talking about Blackwell Convergence for hours. On the other, I feel that I've said so much already in the review of the other first two titles that anything from this point on would be a spoiler.

With the exams taking place these days, I don't really feel like playing anything too complicated lately. Deus Ex: Human Revolution, sobbing on my Steam shelf for several months now bears witness to my brain's inability to munch on too complex reflex skills. Ow well, the good thing is that there's always adventure games. Point and click is really comfortable and reasonable stories are always soothing. That's how I stumbled upon this little jewel.